Real Estate

Perfect Real Estate Tips

Author: Bumbles

Pre-Purchase Inspections – What to Look For?

The Importance of a property inspection

Caveat emptor, or buyer beware. We’re used to having this little piece of Latin wisdom in our heads when we buy electronics or perhaps a home appliance. But how often do we think about it when it comes to buying a property?

Realtors Lead Generated Appointments

Sure, we know it’s important to research the surrounding neighborhood, as well as consider the number of rooms in a house and weigh up whether local zoning laws will allow any renovations we have planned. But it’s just as important to undertake an in-depth of inspection of a property’s smaller details. We buy houses in Largo Fl.

A pre-purchase inspection is critical to ensure you don’t come away with a lemon. Here are just a few of the things you should be looking for.

Plumb its Depths

Making sure the plumbing and water work fine are a key elements to tick off your checklist before buying a house. Missing this out could mean you’ll have expensive repairs to cover down the line, along with expensive water bills.

Take a look at the plumbing fittings and make sure there are no leaks or cracks, and test the various hot and cold taps around the house to make sure they have the right pressure, not to mention that it’s not a strange color.

Also, be sure to check for dampness around drains and the areas where pipes connect to the ground. Some sellers may paint over it, so you may have to get those nostrils working.

Be Roof-Less

Given the fact that owning a home is colloquially referred to as having a roof over your head, this is one area that’s pretty essential to check out.

Try and discern what type of timber was used for the roof frame. While pine is generally quite stable, hardwood can lead to cracks in the ceiling and plaster and a creaky roof.

There’s also some more basic, cosmetic details you’ll want to keep an eye on. If it’s made of iron, make sure there’s no rust. Also, are there loose or broken tiles? Tiled roofs deteriorate over time, and if they’re concrete tiles, may need new sealant after 25 years, and every 10 years after that.

Wall’s Well that Ends Well

Once you’re done with the roof, you want to turn to the walls that are holding it up. There are the obvious issues, such as making sure the walls are straight and free of cracks. This can potentially cost you thousands to repair.

Less obvious things to look out for are mold stains and damp brick walls, as well as patch repair. Shining a light at the wall on an angle can help highlight this.

Tree and Stump Removal

Renovation: A New Lease of Life

Rather than demolish their red brick post-war house, these owners recognised its charm and character, and decided to not only add on but also complement it in a sophisticated fashion. The design inspiration came from the clients’ desire for a clearly contrasting addition to create a house that feels anchored and solid.

Re-work Not A Re-Build

Rather than demolish their red brick post-war house, these owners recognised its charm and character, and decided to not only add on but also complement it in a sophisticated fashion.

Brokers and Realtors Lead Generation Help

As is the case with many homes of this style and era, the design of this red brick single-storey post-war house not only lacked imagination, but also had poor orientation and little connection to the backyard. But these homeowners saw beyond its flaws. “These clients decided to give their original brick home a new lease of life, without taking away the character they found attractive in the first place,” says architect Luke Stanley.

“They have a passion for design and furniture and felt that any new addition they were to introduce was to be of a contemporary nature, and clearly articulated with the original house. Hence the design inspiration came from the clients’ desire for a clearly contrasting addition and realising the original house was a perfect example of how most dwellings of that era paid little heed to the opportunities their topography presented.”

A Passion for Design and Furniture

“They have a passion for design and furniture and felt that any new addition they were to introduce was to be of a contemporary nature, and clearly articulated with the original house. Hence the design inspiration came from the clients’ desire for a clearly contrasting addition and realising the original house was a perfect example of how most dwellings of that era paid little heed to the opportunities their topography presented.”

Their brief called for a contemporary north-facing addition of 73m2 to incorporate a new laundry, living room and master bedroom with ensuite, in order to provide additional space for their growing family and maximise connections to their under-utilised backyard.

Re-configuring the Space

The original portion of the 117m2 house was reconfigured to include a new bathroom and relocation of the existing kitchen (which had only recently been installed). An original storage shed, west-facing sunroom and internal walls were demolished, making way for the new bathroom and reconfigured kitchen.

The new timber-framed addition was built at the rear of the original house, with a glazed services area delineating new and old, and sits on a polished concrete slab, split over two levels.

Internally, the spaces are defined largely by the flooring. The walls and raking ceiling are finished in crisp white, while the polished concrete of the living area, the timber flooring of the bedrooms and the stone tiles of the ensuite define their respective functions within the house.

Passive Solar Design

The highly insulated north-facing addition benefits from passive solar design principles, cross ventilation and double-glazed windows. A series of in-situ concrete blades on the northern elevation provide both shading and protection from summer sun, while allowing the exposed concrete floors to absorb winter solar gain.

The addition makes a strong connection with the fall of the site as a sleek black, timber-clad form that pushes westward up the slope to echo the original gradient. The change in level is navigated in two neat platforms that define their public and private function, while the roofline sails over in a strong singular pitch, unifying the areas underneath.

The clients chose the dark timber cladding and in-situ concrete to provide a clear contrast with the original red brick on the exterior. “They are familiar with high-end furniture design and were looking for a similar level of precision throughout the project,” says Luke. “With this in mind, extra attention was paid to the formwork and edges of the in-situ concrete blades, as we only had one shot at achieving a neat finish.

Wise Investment Decisions

Although on a limited budget, the clients chose to invest in key materials such as the hardwood timber cladding and precisely cast in-situ concrete blades. These concrete blades contrast with the black shell and frame openings to the north of the new addition, creating deep reveals that provide an element of shading and visual privacy to the bedroom at the western extremity.

This new bedroom opens both north and west to the upper lawn area of the split levels, while the lower living area opens directly to a generous spotted gum timber deck, which makes the most of its northern orientation.

Tree and Stump Removal

The Finishing Touches

The backyard was landscaped for the new deck and lawn area, with space along the southern side of the addition retained for a future garage or carport. A new spotted gum timber entry deck was also added to the front of the house.

The timber steps linking the internal floor levels continue through to the backyard, creating informal seating and a kids’ play area. Along with the in-situ concrete blades, they help to anchor the new addition within the site.

“By allowing the extension to engage with the site, the house feels anchored and solid, reversing the notion of a new timber addition being the lightweight sibling to the original brick house,” says Luke.

We buy houses in West Palm Beach

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